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By Today's Dentistry
October 17, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: root canal  

Find out when root canal treatment might be necessary for your smile.root canal

If something feels wrong with your smile this is certainly not something you should just ignore. While no one loves the idea of needing to get a root canal it’s something that could save you a lot of money and heartache in the future. Our Chicago, IL, dentist, Dr. Mark Gamalinda, is here to tell you the telltale signs that a root canal may be needed and why this procedure could be crucial.

What is root canal therapy?

This endodontic treatment (which involves the soft tissue found inside the tooth) is used to treat and save a tooth that has extensive decay, infection or trauma. This procedure will be recommended by our Chicago general dentist if the decay, infection or trauma has affected the integrity and life of the dental pulp. Even though root canal treatment does get a bad rap, it’s really no more invasive than getting a tooth filled. Most people report feeling absolutely nothing during this procedure.

How do I know if I need root canal therapy?

Unfortunately, it’s not always easy to tell whether this treatment is a necessity or not, which is why everyone should visit their dentist every six months for checkups even if they aren’t experiencing symptoms or issues. A lot of dental problems never present any symptoms and the only way we are able to detect them is through a routine exam.

Of course, this doesn’t mean that symptoms won’t always appear. Those who require root canal therapy may experience these issues:

  • A severe or persistent toothache that gets worse when chewing or putting pressure on the tooth
  • Increased and lingering tooth sensitivity to hot or cold
  • Tooth discoloration or darkening
  • Swelling and tender gums around the affected tooth
  • The development of a pimple on the gums (also known as an abscess)

If you have any of these symptoms it’s important that you get it checked out right away. These symptoms can also be indicative of other dental issues that need to be addressed. The sooner you seek treatment the better.

Today’s Dentistry in Chicago, IL, is dedicated to providing a full range of dental services when you need it most. Find out how we can give you the smile you want in the Second City!

By Today's Dentistry
October 15, 2017
Category: Oral Health
Tags: pregnancy   dental care  
FAQDentalCareDuringPregnancy

Pregnancy is a very special and exciting time for expectant women and their families. At this time, many moms-to-be make careful choices to try and do what’s best for themselves and their babies. Wondering what’s the right way to take care of your oral health when you’re expecting? Here are answers to a few of the most common questions about dental care during pregnancy.

Q: Does pregnancy make a woman more susceptible to dental problems?
A: Yes. Pregnancy causes big changes in the levels of certain hormones, and these in turn have a powerful influence on your body. For example, many expectant moms experience food cravings and morning sickness at certain times. Changing hormone levels can also affect your oral health in various ways, including making your gums tender, swollen, and highly sensitive to the harmful bacteria in plaque.

Q: What are “pregnancy tumors” in the mouth?
A: These are benign (non-cancerous) overgrowths of tissue that sometimes develop on the gums during the second trimester. Often appearing between the teeth, these swollen reddish growths are thought to be caused by plaque bacteria. They sometimes go away on their own when pregnancy is over, but may be surgically removed if they don’t.

Q: Is it normal to have bleeding gums during pregnancy?
A: It’s not uncommon, but it does indicate that you need to pay careful attention to your oral hygiene at this time. Pregnancy hormones can cause the tiny blood vessels in your gums to become enlarged; when plaque bacteria are not effectively removed from the mouth, the gums may become inflamed and begin to bleed. This condition is often called “pregnancy gingivitis.” If left untreated, it can progress to a more serious form of gum disease called periodontitis. That’s one reason why regular brushing and flossing are so important during pregnancy — as are routine professional cleanings.

Q: Is it safe to have dental cleanings and checkups during pregnancy?
A: Yes; in fact, it’s a very good idea to have at least one. Studies have shown that women who receive dental treatment during pregnancy face no more risks to their developing babies than those who don’t. On the other hand, poor oral health is known to cause gum disease, and is also suspected of being linked to adverse pregnancy outcomes. Routine dental exams and professional cleanings can help you maintain good oral health and avoid many potential problems during this critical time.

Q: Should I postpone more complicated dental work until after I have a baby?
A: It depends. A study recently published in the Journal of the American Dental Association found it was safe for pregnant women to have routine procedures like fillings, root canals, and extractions, even if they require local anesthesia. So treatments that are essential to an expectant mother’s health shouldn’t be put off. However, if you’re planning to have cosmetic dental work, it might be best to err on the side of caution and wait until after your baby is born.

Have more questions about oral health during pregnancy? Contact our office or schedule a consultation — and be sure to let us know that you are pregnant, so we can make sure you get the extra attention you need. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Pregnancy and Oral Health.”

By Today's Dentistry
September 30, 2017
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   cancer  
KeepaCloseEyeonYourDentalHealthWhileUndergoingCancerTreatment

As a cancer patient, you know how important radiation and chemotherapy are to overcoming the disease. But these treatments often come at a price to other aspects of your health, including your teeth and gums if the treatment target includes the head or neck regions.

Radiation and chemotherapy are effective because they target and destroy cancer cells. Unfortunately, they may also kill non-cancerous, healthy cells; in the mouth, for example, they can damage the cells in the salivary glands and disrupt their ability to produce adequate saliva flow, leading to xerostomia (dry mouth).

This could seriously affect your teeth’s protective enamel shell. As we eat or drink, our mouth’s pH level can become too acidic. Acid is your enamel’s primary enemy because it causes the minerals in the enamel to soften and dissolve (de-mineralization). Saliva neutralizes acid and replaces much of the enamel’s minerals.

Without adequate saliva flow, the enamel will tend to erode over time. You can further aggravate the situation if you routinely consume acidic foods and drinks, like sipping energy drinks or soda during the day. Once the enamel is gone it can’t be replaced naturally, and the teeth will be in serious danger of tooth decay and eventual loss of function and appearance.

To avoid these consequences you should take steps during cancer treatment to reduce your risk for xerostomia or other unhealthy mouth conditions: limit your consumption of acidic foods and beverages; use mouth rinses to counteract acidity and inhibit bacterial growth; and promote saliva flow through medication.

It may be, though, that enamel erosion and subsequent tooth damage is unavoidable. In this case, you may need to consider restorative options with artificial crowns or other cosmetic enhancements — not only to improve your appearance but also to protect your natural teeth from further damage.

Before considering the latter, you should undergo a complete dental examination to assess your condition and make sure you have adequate bone and gum support, and any dental disease under control. From here, we can go about restoring the attractive smile that may have faded during your battle with cancer.

If you would like more information on oral care during and after cancer treatment, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.

By Today's Dentistry
September 15, 2017
Category: Oral Health
ExpertAdviceVivicaAFoxonKissingandOralhealth

Is having good oral hygiene important to kissing? Who's better to answer that question than Vivica A. Fox? Among her other achievements, the versatile actress won the “Best Kiss” honor at the MTV Movie Awards, for a memorable scene with Will Smith in the 1996 blockbuster Independence Day. When Dear Doctor magazine asked her, Ms. Fox said that proper oral hygiene was indeed essential. Actually, she said:

"Ooooh, yes, yes, yes, Honey, 'cause Baby, if you kiss somebody with a dragon mouth, my God, it's the worst experience ever as an actor to try to act like you enjoy it!"

And even if you're not on stage, it's no fun to kiss someone whose oral hygiene isn't what it should be. So what's the best way to step up your game? Here's how Vivica does it:

“I visit my dentist every three months and get my teeth cleaned, I floss, I brush, I just spent two hundred bucks on an electronic toothbrush — I'm into dental hygiene for sure.”

Well, we might add that you don't need to spend tons of money on a toothbrush — after all, it's not the brush that keeps your mouth healthy, but the hand that holds it. And not everyone needs to come in as often every three months. But her tips are generally right on.

For proper at-home oral care, nothing beats brushing twice a day for two minutes each time, and flossing once a day. Brushing removes the sticky, bacteria-laden plaque that clings to your teeth and causes tooth decay and gum disease — not to mention malodorous breath. Don't forget to brush your tongue as well — it can also harbor those bad-breath bacteria.

While brushing is effective, it can't reach the tiny spaces in between teeth and under gums where plaque bacteria can hide. But floss can: That's what makes it so important to getting your mouth really clean.

Finally, regular professional checkups and cleanings are an essential part of good oral hygiene. Why? Because even the most dutiful brushing and flossing can't remove the hardened coating called tartar that eventually forms on tooth surfaces. Only a trained health care provider with the right dental tools can! And when you come in for a routine office visit, you'll also get a thorough checkup that can detect tooth decay, gum disease, and other threats to your oral health.

Bad breath isn't just a turn-off for kissing — It can indicate a possible problem in your mouth. So listen to what award-winning kisser Vivica Fox says: Paying attention to your oral hygiene can really pay off! For more information, contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can read the entire interview with Vivica A. Fox in Dear Doctor's latest issue.

By Today's Dentistry
August 31, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: Dental Implants  
NewYearNewSmile

In the winter months, when the daylight hours grow few, we celebrate the season with holiday lights and good cheer. This season of hope and renewal also gives us a chance to think about the future — to take stock of where we’ve been, and even plan for some changes in the new year.

Deciding to improve your overall health is one great way to start off the year. Of course, we know many resolutions that begin with crash diets and extreme fitness programs won’t be kept up for very long. But if there were one permanent change you could make, which would both enhance your appearance and improve your health… would you do it? If you are missing teeth — or if you’re wearing dentures that aren’t working the way you’d like — then perhaps we can offer a suggestion: Consider dental implants.

Besides being an obvious blemish on your appearance, missing teeth also create problems you can’t see. For one, it’s harder to eat a proper, balanced diet if you have trouble chewing certain foods, potentially leading to serious nutritional problems. For another, when teeth are lost, the bone in your jaw that used to surround them begins to deteriorate. This can cause you to have a prematurely aged look, and make you appear unhappy even when you’re not.

Unfortunately, dentures don’t solve these problems — in fact, they tend to compound them. Many denture wearers report they have problems eating; some even say they eat better without dentures. And dentures don’t stop bone loss; in many cases, especially when they don’t fit correctly, they actually accelerate it.

But there’s really no reason you have to get by with missing teeth. Since they were introduced some three decades ago, dental implants have offered people a better way to replace lost teeth. With implants, you can eat your favorite foods again, smile with complete assurance, and stop worrying about dentures that may fit poorly or slip out at the wrong times.

Fixed solidly in your jaw in a minor surgical procedure, dental implants function just like your natural teeth. Their natural look and “feel” makes it easy to forget they aren’t the teeth you were born with. Best of all, they can last the rest of your life… unlike bridges or dentures. Because they offer a permanent solution, implants can be quite cost-effective in the long run. But the way they can restore your confidence and make you feel good about yourself isn’t something you can put a price on.

So if you have ever thought about making a New Year’s resolution that will really improve your health and well-being — consider dental implants. Just call our office to schedule a consultation. You can learn more in Dear Doctor magazine’s in-depth guide, “Dental Implants.”





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